Entries in the ‘Projects’

Puffins in Peril

Filed in Articles, Projects on Jun.28, 2018

The Farne Islands are a group of islands off the north-east coast of Northumberland. There are between 15 and 20 islands depending on the state of the tide. They are divided into two groups, the Inner Group and the Outer Group. The main islands in the Inner Group are Inner Farne, Knoxes Reef and the East and West Wideopens. The main islands in the Outer Group are Staple Island the Brownsman, North and South Wamses, Big Harcar and the Longstone,the two groups are separated by Staple Sound.


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Pied Flycatchers

Filed in Articles, Projects on Jun.12, 2018

One project I’ve been working on recently is Pied Flycatchers in the Peak District National Park. These birds are so beautiful and visit our shores during the spring and summer months from their wintering home of West Africa and live manly in woodland habitat. Their numbers are quite low and they are on the “amber” list of species by the RSPB meaning they aren’t rare but not common too.


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Autumn – A Bounty of Beauty

Filed in Projects, Workshops on Oct.24, 2017

Autumn is a wonderful time of year in nature, the leaves are a beautiful mosaic of colours before they fall from the trees leaving them bare and exposed. Wildlife gorging on the rich bounty of berries, nuts and other food items all produced at this time of year in preparation for winter.


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The Firetail

Filed in Projects, Wildlife on Jul.10, 2017

I’ve been working on a personal project in the beautiful Peak District, documenting one of the UK’s most beautiful and stunning summer visitors, the Redstart. This attractive little cousin of the Robin and Nightingale is one of my favorite summer visitors to our shores. They are immediately identifiable by their bright orange-red tails, and were also known as ‘firetail’ which they often quiver and constantly flick.


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Taken Back By Nature-Barn Owls

Filed in Articles, Projects on Sep.14, 2015

Barn Owls are a bird that stir a great fascination and emotion for me,  I have loved them since my very early teens. I have had a truly magical time on my Barn Owl project over the summer. As we enter the season of Autumn I just wanted to update you on whats happened since my last blog covering this project that you can read here.

https://www.craigjoneswildlifephotography.co.uk/


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Mothernature-At Her Best and Worst

Filed in Projects, Wildlife on Jun.16, 2015

Over the last several weeks I have had many projects on the go, one such project has been watching a pair of beautiful Pied Flycatchers. These birds visit our shores during the spring and summer months from their wintering home of West Africa and live manly in woodland habitat. Their numbers are quite low and they are on the “amber” list of species by the RSPB meaning they aren’t rare but not common too.

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=craig+jones+wildlife&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:%7Breferrer:source%7D&ie=UTF-8&oe=&rlz=1I7DKUK_en&gfe_rd=cr&ei=fE6AVfj7O83H8ge98oCIDw&gws_rd=ssl

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I have wanted to photograph this species of bird in their woodland habitat for many years but I haven’t been lucky enough to find them. This year I had found a pair and they were nesting in a small nest box in a beautiful deciduous wood. These birds are beautiful and I was very lucky to have found a pair. They landed on a number of naturally occurring branches around this nestbox and I have composed them showing their home and these branches they are using with the following images.

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https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=craig+jones+wildlife&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:%7Breferrer:source%7D&ie=UTF-8&oe=&rlz=1I7DKUK_en&gfe_rd=cr&ei=fE6AVfj7O83H8ge98oCIDw&gws_rd=ssl

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=craig+jones+wildlife&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:%7Breferrer:source%7D&ie=UTF-8&oe=&rlz=1I7DKUK_en&gfe_rd=cr&ei=fE6AVfj7O83H8ge98oCIDw&gws_rd=ssl

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=craig+jones+wildlife&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:%7Breferrer:source%7D&ie=UTF-8&oe=&rlz=1I7DKUK_en&gfe_rd=cr&ei=fE6AVfj7O83H8ge98oCIDw&gws_rd=ssl

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=craig+jones+wildlife&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:%7Breferrer:source%7D&ie=UTF-8&oe=&rlz=1I7DKUK_en&gfe_rd=cr&ei=fE6AVfj7O83H8ge98oCIDw&gws_rd=ssl

Up until this point they were doing really well, both parents feeding and everything looked good. Then around lunch time the following day I was watching another part of the wood where they are hunting the flies when I heard a hissing kind of noise from where the nest box was.

I rushed over and saw the male bird hovering in front of the box and making a noise that I can only describe as an alarm call. Then in a flash something came from the nest box and ran down the front of the box. It was a Weasel with one of the chicks. It happened so quick that I didn’t really have time to do anything or to even think. I did manage to capture a few images of him making off with the chick as the male was hovering to see off the Weasel.

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What happened over the next hour and a half after this first attack was that the same Weasel came back several times to get the rest of the chicks. But as soon as I saw him I made a loud hissing noise myself and other noises to warn him off. Sometimes he stopped at the base of the tree, others he was up and on top of the box. Each time he left with nothing and this went on for a while. After the first attack the parent birds returned but were jumpy when going to the box, they seemed to know what had happened and stayed back and didn’t return with any food for those hours after the attack.

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https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=craig+jones+wildlife&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:%7Breferrer:source%7D&ie=UTF-8&oe=&rlz=1I7DKUK_en&gfe_rd=cr&ei=fE6AVfj7O83H8ge98oCIDw&gws_rd=ssl

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=craig+jones+wildlife&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:%7Breferrer:source%7D&ie=UTF-8&oe=&rlz=1I7DKUK_en&gfe_rd=cr&ei=fE6AVfj7O83H8ge98oCIDw&gws_rd=ssl

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=craig+jones+wildlife&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:%7Breferrer:source%7D&ie=UTF-8&oe=&rlz=1I7DKUK_en&gfe_rd=cr&ei=fE6AVfj7O83H8ge98oCIDw&gws_rd=ssl

I wanted to know what had happened inside the box but I had to stop myself from going to see and investigate because I didn’t want to disturb anything or leave my scent on the box and its not right to interfere with nature. I had done my best making sure that the Weasel didn’t get any more chicks during those many attempts. When I left there had been no sighting of the Weasel for several hours and I really hoped when I returned the following day that the chicks survived and the Weasel had moved on.

Nature is beautiful but at times very cruel I know this well but when you witness it for yourself it is upsetting and I can’t blame the Weasel for wanting to feed his family but as I say when you witness animals being killed by others its not nice and I had watched this pair of Flycatchers for a while now and then this happens.

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=craig+jones+wildlife&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:%7Breferrer:source%7D&ie=UTF-8&oe=&rlz=1I7DKUK_en&gfe_rd=cr&ei=fE6AVfj7O83H8ge98oCIDw&gws_rd=ssl

The following day I returned just after dawn, I waited several hours and no return by any adult. Before opening the box I made the noise of the adult bird and gently tapped the outside of the box and there was no noise or calls from inside. At that point I lifted the lid wearing gloves. The Weasel had gone back when I left by the looks of things and had all of them, very sad. Nature is cruel but that’s the circle of life and I learned that very early in my life but it was a  real shame.

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I spent most of the morning searching the same wood for another pair as there are nest boxes put up for them. As I was looking I always listen to bird calls, they will always let you know what is around. I know the Pied Flycatchers well and I saw a lone male bird that kept coming to another box. Once at the entrance hole he’d paused and then flew off. I didn’t know if he was preparing his nest for inspection for a female or just looking for another nest box or there was already another female inside.

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=craig+jones+wildlife&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:%7Breferrer:source%7D&ie=UTF-8&oe=&rlz=1I7DKUK_en&gfe_rd=cr&ei=fE6AVfj7O83H8ge98oCIDw&gws_rd=ssl

Then I heard ” Have you seen much?” and I turned around and a bloke was standing there, after a few words I recognized him and he me and we got talking as I had last seen him some five years back. I told him about the box that had lost its chicks and that I was watching this new box.

He informed me that a female was sitting on eggs in the box I was watching and that he was here to ring her. Keith is a member of British Trust for Ornithology and is a ringer in the Staffordshire moorlands area for them and has been for many years. He knew me and my work and passion and so he trusted me with this information and I watched him with great care place a small bag over the roof of the nestbox while blocking the entrance hole. Carefully then he removed the bag from the top of the box and inside was this beautiful female Pied Flycatcher.

I asked if I could take a few photos and it was no problem as Keith put the ring on, checked over the bird and once done he let her go. Soon after she was back in the nest. Amazing to be so close and what luck I’ve had at this site I said to myself. From losing a whole family of chicks to then being so close to one and knowing the BTO ringer for the area.

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Another truly beautiful bird the Redstart, a pair are sharing the same deciduous wood as these Pied Flycatchers which is wonderful. They are nesting in a nearby old oak tree not far from the new flycatchers nest.  I have watched them too over the last few weeks and now the chicks have fledged and I counted around eight in and around the tree tops.

I’m hoping to get a few images of these but they are providing a difficult little subject to get near because their parents have hidden them away and I don’t want to impact on their lives or their parents. The following images are of that Redstart family.

Another truly beautiful bird the Redstart who are sharing the same deciduous wood as the Pied Flycatchers which is wonderful. They are nesting in a nearby old oak tree not far from the new flycatchers nest.  I have watched them too over the last few weeks and now the chicks have fledged and I counted around 8 in and around the tree tops.  I’m hoping to get a few images of these but they are providing a difficult little subject to get near because their parents have hidden them away and I don’t want to impact on their lives or their parents. The following images are of that Redstart family.

 https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=craig+jones+wildlife&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:%7Breferrer:source%7D&ie=UTF-8&oe=&rlz=1I7DKUK_en&gfe_rd=cr&ei=fE6AVfj7O83H8ge98oCIDw&gws_rd=ssl

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=craig+jones+wildlife&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:%7Breferrer:source%7D&ie=UTF-8&oe=&rlz=1I7DKUK_en&gfe_rd=cr&ei=fE6AVfj7O83H8ge98oCIDw&gws_rd=ssl

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=craig+jones+wildlife&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:%7Breferrer:source%7D&ie=UTF-8&oe=&rlz=1I7DKUK_en&gfe_rd=cr&ei=fE6AVfj7O83H8ge98oCIDw&gws_rd=ssl

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=craig+jones+wildlife&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:%7Breferrer:source%7D&ie=UTF-8&oe=&rlz=1I7DKUK_en&gfe_rd=cr&ei=fE6AVfj7O83H8ge98oCIDw&gws_rd=ssl

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=craig+jones+wildlife&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:%7Breferrer:source%7D&ie=UTF-8&oe=&rlz=1I7DKUK_en&gfe_rd=cr&ei=fE6AVfj7O83H8ge98oCIDw&gws_rd=ssl

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=craig+jones+wildlife&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:%7Breferrer:source%7D&ie=UTF-8&oe=&rlz=1I7DKUK_en&gfe_rd=cr&ei=fE6AVfj7O83H8ge98oCIDw&gws_rd=ssl

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=craig+jones+wildlife&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:%7Breferrer:source%7D&ie=UTF-8&oe=&rlz=1I7DKUK_en&gfe_rd=cr&ei=fE6AVfj7O83H8ge98oCIDw&gws_rd=ssl

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=craig+jones+wildlife&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:%7Breferrer:source%7D&ie=UTF-8&oe=&rlz=1I7DKUK_en&gfe_rd=cr&ei=fE6AVfj7O83H8ge98oCIDw&gws_rd=ssl

When you go out taking photos of a project or something you love please just stop, sit down and look around you. You will see some many living beings, so many different images all around you. I love to capture this within my work and all you have to do is think outside of the species you are there for and look further afield and you will see natures beauty all around you.

The following images show some of the other birds that share this amazing deciduous wood alongside these Pied Flycatchers.- Blackcap, Song Thrush, Wren, Great Tit. Also there are a few images of the insects that provide food for these birds, an arty photo of ferns.

When you go out taking photos of a project or something you love please just stop, sit down and look around you. You will see some many living beings, so many different images all around you. I love to capture this within my work and all you have to do is think outside of the species you are there for and look further afield and you will see natures beauty all around you. The following images show some of the other birds that share this amazing deciduous wood alongside these Pied Flycatchers.- Blackcap, Song Thrush, Wren. Also there are a few images of the insects that provide food for these birds, an arty photo of ferns which I love and some close up images of Long-tailed Mayfly that are very common in this wood. Also there is an image of a Harvestman which are beautiful little creatures.  Harvestmen don’t have a waist or separate abdomen like spiders as they are often mistaken for them. They are part of the Opiliones family which are fascinating. The floor of the wood is littered with the Red Campion flower too the place is beautiful.

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=craig+jones+wildlife&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:%7Breferrer:source%7D&ie=UTF-8&oe=&rlz=1I7DKUK_en&gfe_rd=cr&ei=fE6AVfj7O83H8ge98oCIDw&gws_rd=ssl

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=craig+jones+wildlife&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:%7Breferrer:source%7D&ie=UTF-8&oe=&rlz=1I7DKUK_en&gfe_rd=cr&ei=fE6AVfj7O83H8ge98oCIDw&gws_rd=ssl

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=craig+jones+wildlife&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:%7Breferrer:source%7D&ie=UTF-8&oe=&rlz=1I7DKUK_en&gfe_rd=cr&ei=fE6AVfj7O83H8ge98oCIDw&gws_rd=ssl

Also there is an image of a Harvestman which are beautiful little creatures. Harvestmen don’t have a waist or separate abdomen like spiders as they are often mistaken for them. They are part of the Opiliones family which are fascinating. There are some close up images of Long-tailed Mayfly that are very common in this wood too that just looked stunning. The floor of the wood is littered with the Red Campion flower too the place is so beautiful and full of wildlife once you look around you.

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=craig+jones+wildlife&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:%7Breferrer:source%7D&ie=UTF-8&oe=&rlz=1I7DKUK_en&gfe_rd=cr&ei=fE6AVfj7O83H8ge98oCIDw&gws_rd=ssl

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=craig+jones+wildlife&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:%7Breferrer:source%7D&ie=UTF-8&oe=&rlz=1I7DKUK_en&gfe_rd=cr&ei=fE6AVfj7O83H8ge98oCIDw&gws_rd=ssl

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https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=craig+jones+wildlife&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:%7Breferrer:source%7D&ie=UTF-8&oe=&rlz=1I7DKUK_en&gfe_rd=cr&ei=fE6AVfj7O83H8ge98oCIDw&gws_rd=ssl

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=craig+jones+wildlife&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:%7Breferrer:source%7D&ie=UTF-8&oe=&rlz=1I7DKUK_en&gfe_rd=cr&ei=fE6AVfj7O83H8ge98oCIDw&gws_rd=ssl

I’m hoping to get some images of the Pied Flycatchers feeding their young as I think they have another week or so inside the nextbox. The Redstart chicks are all around the place, and getting a few images of these are harder as they are hidden away so I will not impact on their lives just for a photograph. Fingers crossed this new pair of Pied Flycatchers manage to rear their young successfully and I will be there to capture it I hope.

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=craig+jones+wildlife&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-US:%7Breferrer:source%7D&ie=UTF-8&oe=&rlz=1I7DKUK_en&gfe_rd=cr&ei=fE6AVfj7O83H8ge98oCIDw&gws_rd=ssl

If I get lucky I will post the photographs in a future blog post just updating this wonderful project I have been doing. Finding your own subjects and photographing them over time is one of the best things as a wildlife photographer you can do. You learn so much more and you never truly know what you will encounter or see where you have to use your own skills and fieldcraft.

Working like this and taking images “as seen” on the ground and alongside nature is the truest form of wildlife photography in an industry full of set ups and pay as you go sites all producing the same images.  I would really recommend working like you see here to anyone that whats to learn more about their own wildlife photography and their subjects, good luck and many thanks.

Craig Jones Wildlife Photography


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Sumatra-On The Frontline

Filed in Charities, Projects on Mar.11, 2015

Sumatra, the remote, Indonesian island where I was shadowing the rescue team –HOCRU from the Orangutan Information Centre- OIC.  during the two weeks there. The last time I worked with these guys was just before the Spotlight Sumatra exhibition in London, which was an amazing success.

Craig Jones Wildlife Photography

Craig Jones Wildlife Photography

As soon as I arrived in Medan the capital of Sumatra I was picked up by Panut and we headed over to the HQ of OIC. We went through a very loose plan for my trip because nothing is promised or can be planned with regard to the rescues of Sumatran Orangutans that find themselves cut off, surrounded on all sides with conflict palm oil. This rescue team was set up by Panut as a direct response to these conditions these crucially endangered orangutans face on Sumatra each and everyday.

With the preparation, travelling and release there is alot of time involved with each rescue so during the two weeks I rarely had any free time. My aim by shadowing these guys is to show the world what they do and how etc. This is the only rescue team on the island of Sumatra, something when I say it still surprises me because the scale of the problems in Sumatra with Sumatran Orangutans are massive.

After spending the night travelling we reached the house in which we were to spend the night ready for the following morning when we were to meet with the forest police force and then go and rescue this orangutan. OIC has a network of local people that help them, and they also put the team up whenever they can, looking after them.

https://www.craigjoneswildlifephotography.co.uk/

On the morning of the raid we were up early, I dont sleep well when Im getting ready for something so I was up way before the rescue team from Orangutan Information Centre. We had some breakfast, a team talk from the director of OIC- Panut  and we set off. All I knew was a young Sumatran Orangutan was being held as a pet and that we could gain access into the courtyard at a certain time and with the help of the local/forest department police we would rescue her.

On the way I got my cameras ready, settings and lens chosen, once we arrived we parked up we entered the small courtyard and to my left I saw a tiny cage with a Sumatran Orangutan slumped on the floor. The smell of urine was really bad as this tiny head lifted up and made eye contact with us. In the background I saw the owner come a man around 45-50 average build and he was talking to the police and team as I lay level with her and spoke to her. She was banging her body into the cage, perhaps excited there were new people in the yard. I’d like to think for those brief moments she came alive and was happy as I was saying “you’re okay now you will be free in a minute so relax”.

Then the tone and tempo changed and the man was standing in front of me talking loudly in Indonesian and waving his arm with a pointed finger. I ignored him and carried on taking images of the young female.Then I heard ” Craig… we have to go he wants us to leave” I was puzzled and said very little. Once back in the car I was told the police got scared, didnt want to take the orangutan or apply the “Law” that they have the power to do. The man holding the Orangutan told them he was an ex-Aceh rebel and was part of the mafia in that area and that if the orangutan was taken we would all disappear.

A common problem I have come across in Sumatra, fear, intimidation, corruption, bribes, money and a total lack of willingness to apply the rules the world have applied to these critically endangered animals. OIC dont have the powers of arrest, they depend on the police to help them and have to pay them for their time, petrol and any other costs. Those we met on that morning came in civilian dress, weren’t wearing their uniform and had little interest in their work or helping the orangutan. Soon after they dropped their invoice off to Paunt though for prompt payment.

The helpless task of saving Sumatran orangutans is made so much harder by the corruption there and to this day I am told this female is still being held illegally. She was estimated to be 6 years old and the children there told the team they had had her a number of years. This tiny small cage has been home for years and it was very troubling and upsetting to see. Efforts to gain her freedom continue, these images show just what a tough and emotional job these guys have and even when everything is on their side things still don’t go their way.

I’d like to think for a few moments her life changed as we were there, she woke, took food from Paunt and begin moving around her tiny cage. Leaving her behind troubles me to this day. This was as close to the frontline as you can get , in the yard of a mafia mans home seeing the results of the illegal pet trade close up for myself. The following images visualize what we saw on that morning I hope, and are dedicated to that Sumatran Orangutan.

https://www.craigjoneswildlifephotography.co.uk/

https://www.craigjoneswildlifephotography.co.uk/

https://www.craigjoneswildlifephotography.co.uk/blog/projects/sumatra-on-the-frontline/20150310681/

https://www.craigjoneswildlifephotography.co.uk/

https://www.craigjoneswildlifephotography.co.uk/

https://www.craigjoneswildlifephotography.co.uk/

https://www.craigjoneswildlifephotography.co.uk/

https://www.craigjoneswildlifephotography.co.uk/

Craig Jones Wildlife Photography

https://www.craigjoneswildlifephotography.co.uk/

We then headed back to the locals house to eat and rest for the next day as the plan was to locate the female and her baby and fingers crossed rescue her. Again we woke early, got our gear together and set off for the area in which the reports had come into the team of her presence. A number of locals were helping to locate her so when we arrived the team knew roughly the area. I watched as Ricko the vet and the rest of the team put into practice a well drilled operation they have gone through many times.It was then just a matter then of waiting, watching, listening and fingers crossed we’d find her.

https://www.craigjoneswildlifephotography.co.uk/

https://www.craigjoneswildlifephotography.co.uk/

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The shout came back and I followed Ricko the vet, walking through the fragmented forest, we came across several trees and it was then I first saw her. The marksman had already darted her and soon after she fell into the large net held out and open below her by the whole of the HOCRO team as well as some locals. In a matter of minutes I heard a loud crash and she and the baby fell from the trees and landed safely into the net. The team took her to a safe area so they could do their vital checks.

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https://www.craigjoneswildlifephotography.co.uk/

When you see these beautiful animals up close you are always struck by their size and colour. It is amazing to be so close to one and I remember my first rescue with this team back in September 2012. Once in a safe place the baby was taken from the mum in order for the check to be carried out. A member of the team got the baby and walked off very carefully so as not to stress the baby any further. Then the vet, Ricko checked the female, inserted a microchip, checked for any injuries, state of heath and so on.

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https://www.craigjoneswildlifephotography.co.uk/blog/projects/sumatra-on-the-frontline/20150310681/

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Craig Jones Wildlife Photography

Once this was done the team carried her to the rescue truck and reunited mother and baby as they placed them both in the cage that was to take them to a safer part of the national park and a second chance of life. We then drove an hour or so to the release site where we had to cross,shoulder deep a river to reach the safe part of the national park.

Craig Jones Wildlife Photography

https://www.craigjoneswildlifephotography.co.uk/blog/projects/sumatra-on-the-frontline/20150310681/

Craig Jones Wildlife Photography

Craig Jones Wildlife Photography

https://www.craigjoneswildlifephotography.co.uk/blog/projects/sumatra-on-the-frontline/20150310681/

Craig Jones Wildlife Photography

https://www.craigjoneswildlifephotography.co.uk/blog/projects/sumatra-on-the-frontline/20150310681/

https://www.craigjoneswildlifephotography.co.uk/blog/projects/sumatra-on-the-frontline/20150310681/

Craig Jones Wildlife Photography

Craig Jones Wildlife Photography

Craig Jones Wildlife Photography

Craig Jones Wildlife Photography

It was great to witness all this and the end result once the team lifted the door of the cage and slowly she came out along with her baby and climbed the first tree she saw. Just wonderful to witness and see and it was a great day for the team and these two Sumatran Orangutans. We then crossed the river once more which I must say was so refreshing as the temperatures in Sumatra at this time of year is a blistering 36-38 degrees and the humidity levels are very high so you’re always wet anyway.

Once back to our base in Aceh we washed off and relaxed for a while before the 10-12 hour drive south back to the HQ of OIC in Medan. The driving and planning like I say often takes many hours if not days so even though a rescue itself is short its the before, after and traveling that makes the hours flyby.

Once we got back to the headquarters of OIC in Medan a long 12 hour drive the HOCRU team cleaned and packed away the kit and headed home. Some had been away from their families for nearly ten days so everyone was looking forward to the rest and time with loved ones. I cleaned all my camera equipment and charged batteries and backed up my images and did some editing of the rescue images to send back to the UK for SOS– Sumatran Orangutan Society. That night I slept at Panuts house and met his lovely family, wife, and two young children, one boy and one girl. The following day I woke and had breakfast and then headed to the office with Panut and carried on doing some editing to get the images back to Helen, the director of SOS. The news was breaking back in the UK and many sites carried the story and images – EIASOS.

That afternoon though everything changed, the team had a call to let them know a male Sumatran Orangutan had become trapped in land just outside a palm oil plantation. After several calls the team were called in from their homes and we all gathered our gear and headed north once more to the province of Aceh.  All we knew again was their was a male there that had wandered into land where locals were working and they had become scared.

OIC has posters up all around this area and with the help of locals they ring and alert them should a Sumatran Orangutan come into conflict with humans or became trapped and this was a perfect example of that once more. I had been in the country less than a week and already we were on our way to our second rescue it was unbelievable and quite sad that the Sumatran Orangutans are in such danger because for every one that gets rescued there must be many more that don’t and end up being killed or sold into the pet trade which really saddened me.

We reached there quite late, with around a couple of hours light left. The team went into their well drilled routine and off they went to try and locate this male. After a while we caught a brief sighting of him, a hand then he vanished. He seemed to know how to hide and the sun set that night as he gave us the slip. The search was called off as dusk fell, we stayed in a nearby plantation which were helping the rescue team. They made us welcome and cooked some food for us which was a welcome break as with the travelling and searching not many of us had eaten. We then got our heads down and looked forward to the morning.

Before first light we were all up and in place, the team were searching and watching for any tell tale signs of movement. After searching for two hours, they found him, I was on the top of the valley looking down as the team went in. Not long after they had darted him and then began the long walk to the top carrying him in the net with the locals and people from the nearby plantation helping to carry this massive male to where the vet could check him.

The male Sumatran Orangutan is the most beautiful of all the great apes. With privileged access I wanted to try to reflect that beauty within an image. After the team had done all checks on him, I was given the nod by Ricko the vet and I took this very personal image again with my macro lens. Being so close at times felt surreal, 5-6 times stronger than man, this male whose age was around 35 was in his prime and very handsome. He wouldn’t have woken up from the tranquilizer given to him at the point of rescue but still being this close to such a massive and powerful ape made my heart beat so fast. His facial hairs I love and are one of the key characteristics Sumatran Orangutans have from their Borneo Orangutan cousins. The following images take you through that days events.

https://www.craigjoneswildlifephotography.co.uk/blog/projects/sumatra-on-the-frontline/20150310681/

Craig Jones Wildlife Photography

https://www.craigjoneswildlifephotography.co.uk/blog/projects/sumatra-on-the-frontline/20150310681/

https://www.craigjoneswildlifephotography.co.uk/blog/projects/sumatra-on-the-frontline/20150310681/

Craig Jones Wildlife Photography

https://www.craigjoneswildlifephotography.co.uk/blog/projects/sumatra-on-the-frontline/20150310681/

Craig Jones Wildlife Photography

https://www.craigjoneswildlifephotography.co.uk/blog/projects/sumatra-on-the-frontline/20150310681/

Craig Jones Wildlife Photography

Craig Jones Wildlife Photography

Craig Jones Wildlife Photography

Craig Jones Wildlife Photography

https://www.craigjoneswildlifephotography.co.uk/blog/projects/sumatra-on-the-frontline/20150310681/

Craig Jones Wildlife Photography

Craig Jones Wildlife Photography

These are the HOCRU team and some of the helpers from the plantation and locals that helped to carry this massive male pictured above.  Once he was safety in the cage we loaded up the truck and headed some distance away to the national park to release this beautiful male back into the rainforests where he belongs. When the gate on the cage is pulled up I’m always nervous as to how the Orangutan will come out, they always climb the nearest tree and vanish. This was no different, so amazing to see and witness though and this image below captures that wonderful moment.

https://www.craigjoneswildlifephotography.co.uk/blog/projects/sumatra-on-the-frontline/20150310681/

Craig Jones Wildlife Photography

As we headed back to Medan from Aceh the team were over the moon and so was I. We drove through the night to get back and once home everyone was so tired. The rescue team were given a few days off by Panut and headed home. I backed up my images and headed to bed also. In just over a week on the island of Sumatra I had witnessed three Sumatran Orangutans rescued and relocated and it was amazing to see and witness. As I closed my eyes that night I hoped they were all doing well back in the wild.

My itinerary gave me some time to edit and get the images ready for OIC/SOS over the next day or so and I had time to sleep and get some much needed rest. While you travel around Sumatra it’s hard to escape the vast palm oil plantations that cover most of Sumatra now and also the deforestation that litter the landscape of Sumatra.  The following words and images reflect how I saw this and how I felt driving through these soulless places.

“THE BIRDS DONT SING ANYMORE” by craig jones

Soulless, a lifeless landscape of palm oil forests. The sun still rises in the East, each day it tries desperately to bring life to the spot where once some of the worlds finest rainforest stood. But nothing grows, nothing lives apart from alien palm oil trees

Nature wont forgive, a defiant act, its last stand against those that came without warning ripping every bit of life out in such a brutal manner, killing everything that lived there.

Nature wont allow the same to happen again

Craig Jones Wildlife Photography

Craig Jones Wildlife Photography

Craig Jones Wildlife Photography

Craig Jones Wildlife Photography

Over the next few days the plan was to visit Medan Zoo for a mission that I hope will end happily for a certain animals while I photographed some of the conditions the animals live in there. After that I headed to see my friend Darma a guide for the forest who I hadn’t seen since September 2012 when I spent several days trekking wild Sumatran Orangutans. I spent some time in the jungles with him again and some much needed peace and beauty after the last week or so. Then I spent time with the HOCRU team in the field once more, after which I spent a wonderful day with the Sumatran Elephants before doing some undercover work and photography. All of this will be covered in my next blog.

I hope you have enjoyed this first blog and if you’d like to donate to this rescue team, the only one of its kind on the island of Sumatra then please see this link many thanks.

Craig Jones Wildlife Photography


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Back Among Nature

Filed in Projects, Workshops on Feb.20, 2014

Being among  nature is a place I belong and feel most at easy at so its been great to get back out with my camera recently to start photographing the beautiful wildlife on the lead up to spring, the favorite time of year for me. With the issues with rain and flooding over the last several weeks it has delayed some of the projects I have planned for this year. The rain though, fingers crossed seems to have given us the worst and as many communities are still underwater around the UK my sympathies go to them.

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Wildlife hasn’t had a great time either with vast areas of the countryside underwater where many animals have suffered like illustrated with the images above of a Short-eared Owl trying to hunt but for miles around all the fields with flooded, quite a sad and upsetting thing for me to see as I really felt for this owl while I recently watched him to to hunt.

I have started working on my Great Crested Grebes project, a bird I love, their elegant pose, their beautiful markings and stunning plumage makes them one of the most handsome water dwelling birds in the UK in my eyes. They are the largest of the European Grebes and during the spring and summer they are such a striking bird, with their spectacular head, ruff and spiky head tuffs when they greet each other or display during courtship.

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Last year I photographed these birds at the same site but was unable to go back at the start of the breeding season due to commitments, so this year I’m hoping to capture them as they build their bond between each other and go through their amazing courtship dance where they dive for weed, surfacing with this in their bills and offer it to one another while sharply turning their heads back and forth.

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In between the pouring rain there have been breaks in the weather and I have spent alot time there now, the lives of these amazing birds played out before me on each visit. They show real love and care for each other, when one goes out of sight the other calls in an attempt to locate its mate, such a strong bond which is so lovely to witness.

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I am using a hide on the shore to photograph this pair of Grebes, just on the water’s edge and not in the water as this disturbs the birds and other species of animals around too much. Getting there before the sun comes up, with the dawn chorus as my companion, each bird jockeying for their own patch, staking their clam to that bit of land.

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The are many species of birds there too, all starting to defend their patch so to speak, most are vocal from before dawn onward and there seems lots of fighting and warning  off others in readiness to find a lady and breed. I love to watch and capture animal behavior and by doing so you learn so much more about your subject over time. I managed to capture a full frontal of the male Goldeneye here, if luck is on your side and if you get the head face on they can have a real evil look to them as in the image below.

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Canada Geese calling and fighting break the mornings silence many times during my recent visits there, I only wished these images had sound.It’s such an amazing time of day and one you greatly benefit from for being among its beauty and peace. The water levels are still high here so im hoping everything settles down and things can return to normal as soon as possible for people and wildlife really.

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I really am hoping to spend as much time at this site over the next several weeks before I leave for Sumatra for two weeks where I will be working and shadowing the amazing work of SOCP – Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme, headed up by Dr Ian Singleton, but more news on the very soon.

http://www.sumatranorangutan.org/

https://www.craigjoneswildlifephotography.co.uk/

In the meantime I have some 2015 dates for my photo tours now up on my website click here to view them.  My One to Ones now in their fifth year are as popular as ever so if you’d like to learn more about everything from fieldcraft, to subject knowledge to your own photography then click here to see the places I visit with clients.

I will update my blog with more images from this site in due coarse, I wish you all well with the weather and the forthcoming season of Spring, many thanks.

Craig Jones Wildlife Photography


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